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Thread: Singer, Singer, Singer . . .

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  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Loathe. Sorry.

    An insult to longhoods.

  3. #3
    Shift Knob Maker
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    Love... If I could I would...

    Mark..

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    aka techweenie Eminence Gris's Avatar
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    Me love long time.
    techweenie.com

    My parts fetcher: 2018 Chevy Volt | My 'other car' '04 Turbo

  5. #5
    Early S Reg #1395 LongRanger's Avatar
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    More Singer, Singer, Singer . . .


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    nemo me impune lacessit Kris Clewell's Avatar
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    the internet makes the world smaller. It makes something like this seem less special. The craftsmanship seems top notch, and unparalleled. That said, If I were rich enough to afford one, it wouldn't be my first choice, I'd rather have something with a little more legitimate history.
    Last edited by Chuck Miller; 05-03-2015 at 05:14 PM.
    -Kris Clewell

    Professional photojournalist

    red decklid club member #1

  7. #7
    Senior Member 62S-R-S's Avatar
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    The seats are superb...especially if they could adjust manually. The tunnel is left bare, tight loop carpet there.

    Headlights - plastic reflector - hmmmmm.

    Handwork in the engine bay..

    http://www.early911sregistry.org/for...045-I-m-no-fan

  8. #8
    Early S Reg #1395 LongRanger's Avatar
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    More etc . . .

    Ezra Dyer . . .

    '. . . I’m accustomed to signing paperwork before driving a car, with fine print concerning insurance coverage and admonitions about road-tripping to Juárez. But before I drive Virginia, the latest creation from Singer Vehicle Design, the paperwork and pinkie-swears concern the terminology I’ll use when referring to the car: this is “a Porsche 911 that has been restored by Singer Vehicle Design.” Got it? Nothing else. The Germans, it seems, will drop the legal hammer with a quickness on any company that entangles its brand with Porsche’s, even when that company celebrates and glorifies the 911 with cars like Virginia, here. Singer founder Rob Dickinson — former lead singer of the band Catherine Wheel, hence the name —doesn’t take it personally. “I think they appreciate what we do,” he says, noting that the car before us wears both Singer and Porsche badges. “But they’ve got to beat everyone with the same stick.”

    With that out of the way, we turn to the car, which is named for the state in which it’s soon destined to reside. What Dickinson does, essentially, is pair his favorite air-cooled 911 — the 1989-1994 964 generation — with carbon-fiber bodywork evoking an early 1970s car. Virginia, under the skin, is a 1990 Carrera 2, its matching-numbers 3.6-liter flat six punched out to 3.8 liters and fettled by Cosworth to produce around 360 hp. But the car looks sort of like a re-imagined 1972 Carrera RS.

    Every detail of the car reflects a consideration of how to achieve a particular aesthetic, a vision of the perfect 911. Pop the rear deck to peer at the engine, and you find that the bulkhead is upholstered in flame-retardant quilted leather. Yes, Virginia, your engine compartment is upholstered like the seats on a Bentley Mulsanne. Naturally, I have to ask: What kind of money are we talking, here? “If you gave me a half-million dollars,” says Dickinson, “there wouldn’t be much change back.”

    That thought is weighing on me heavily as we set off from the Ingram Collection in Durham, N.C. Rory Ingram and his father, Bob, are the biggest Porsche guys this side of Seinfeld or Stuttgart, and Rory leads the way in a silver Carrera GT — selected for a drive mainly because it was parked in front of the door, while the 918 Spyder was boxed in by a couple other equally outrageous machines.

    On one hand, I’m trying to be considerate of this freshly completed, deep-six-figure, carbon-fiber jewel of a machine. On the other, I’m trying to keep up with a Carrera GT, with Ingram whipping it along at a healthy pace. And Dickinson, riding shotgun, is encouraging me to open it up a little bit. You don’t really get the experience below 3,000 rpm.

    So there we are, the highway overpasses echoing with the howl of a LeMans-worthy V-10 and a hand-built air-cooled six, Virginia pulling hard above 4,500 rpm and issuing that signature crackling exhalation on the overrun. Weighing only about 2,700 lbs., this car has the power-to-weight ratio of a 997 GT3, and that’s about how it accelerates. The weight of every control feels perfectly calibrated, heavy but precise, from the six-speed shifter to the turn signal stalk. I’m not sure whether Singer tuned the feel of the turn signals, but I wouldn’t doubt it.

    We end up at a state park, where the road snakes through a canopy of trees and the 911 induces a kind of trance — really, this is power steering? Power steering can’t feel this good. Straps to open the door: nice. Check out this roll bar. You can see it in the rearview mirror along with the flashing blue lights.

    Which belong to a park ranger. Who is driving a Ford Ranger. The ranger in the Ranger pulled me over to point out the 25-mph speed limit in the park and to ask whether I had a permit to shoot video. No, sir, but I would love to go get one!

    With another piece of paperwork completed, we bid farewell to the park and head back out onto the mean streets of Durham, now using the Carrera GT as a camera car. It’s been a strange morning. And a great one. Dickinson, perfectionist that he is, notes that Virginia has an exhaust resonance at about 3,000 rpm and is taking too long to fire up, so he’s got a couple more to-do items before the car goes to its owner. I’m glad I could help.

    Back at the garage, the 911 takes its place amongst the other Porsches, looking perfectly appropriate in this fleet. So far, Singer’s creations include cars with names like Brooklyn, France and Dubai. But I wouldn’t be surprised if the next one is named North Carolina . . .
    '

    https://www.yahoo.com/autos/ride-wit...114771597.html


    Guy used be sooooo funny

    Sounds like a bit of shill, now


    PS Check-out those rockers + bumper decos
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Senior Member Macroni's Avatar
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    Has Jerry Seinfeld bought one yet?
    ES#1275 / R#642 / O#4

  10. #10
    Early S Reg #1395 LongRanger's Avatar
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    More Singer, Singer, Singer . . .


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