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Thread: 906 rocker arms...Value??

  1. #11
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    Added pics to original post
    1966 Porsche 911
    1960 Chevrolet Corvair Monza 900
    2000 911 C2
    1979 Crossle F-35 F/F
    1969 Lynx Mk 2 F/V

  2. #12
    Those are standard, early forged rockers- not 906.

    Jon B.
    Vista, CA

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by 1red66911 View Post
    Added pics to original post
    Just as Jon B. said, those are forged early 911 rocker arms with bushings and screw valve adjustment. Here's a quick iPhone snap of the picture in Bruce Anderson's book:


    The 906 rocker arm on the right is quite different.

    As to what they're worth. Stoddards wants $151.76 for part # 930.105.043.05 and Sierra Madre Collection wants $133.41 for part # 930.105.043.02 which might be an earlier version or just a matter of when they got the website data.

    Both of those look to be cast steel with bronze bushings.

    I suppose forged rocker arms with bushings would be worth more than cast but I don't think there's much demand. Were I you. I'd put them in my engine (which is exactly what I've done with mine).
    Jim Alton
    San Dimas, CA
    Early 911S Registry # 237

    1966 VW 21 Window Bus
    1965 Porsche 911 coupe
    1958 Porsche 356A cabriolet

  4. #14

  5. #15
    Member
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    My mystery has been solved. Thanks for all the input. Skeeters
    1966 Porsche 911
    1960 Chevrolet Corvair Monza 900
    2000 911 C2
    1979 Crossle F-35 F/F
    1969 Lynx Mk 2 F/V

  6. #16
    Member #226 R Gruppe Life Member #147
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    The early race rockers didn't have oil groves. By the ST/RSR there were oil groves, don't know when exactly when groves started. The race rocker shafts I've used for 20 yrs are just parkerized standard shafts. That is what we determined the coating was. G

  7. #17
    Porsche wrench/life coach Frank Beck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1red66911 View Post
    My mystery has been solved. Thanks for all the input. Skeeters
    I do find it impossible to believe that Walt told you those were 906 rockers. It does beg the question though: If he used later, cast rockers which cams did he install in your motor?


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  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by gled49 View Post
    The early race rockers didn't have oil groves. By the ST/RSR there were oil groves, don't know when exactly when groves started. The race rocker shafts I've used for 20 yrs are just parkerized standard shafts. That is what we determined the coating was. G
    If you 'Parkerise' a standard rocker, and I would agree that this is probably the surface treatment used, it is quite possible that the shaft won't fit into the cam carrier.

    There is a typical growth of around 5-9 microns on each surface which is around 10-18 microns on diameter. I thunk it would be necessary to 'process grind' the shafts before Parkerising.

    This process can also result in high strength steels suffering from Hydrogen Embrittlement and the parts should ideally be baked shortly after Parkerising.

    We use diffusion based treatment which is developed in a PVD Chamber, it produces an oleophilic surface layer of around 1000HV. We process grind the shaft we make before tretment and growth is controlled to a much tighter tolerance than Parkerising can produce.

    We did consider Parkerising but the control of coating thickness was tricky.

  9. #19
    Member #226 R Gruppe Life Member #147
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    Chris, you're way too technical for me. We take good used shafts chamfer the groves, polish them, parkerize them, install them in 40 year old semi worn housings and run them with 40 year old lash cap rockers. I've been running and refreshing my armature motors for decades. I'm sure there's better ways to do it than ours.

  10. #20
    We charge around $25.00 for our new shafts with a more modern coating and we are now trying to develop a shaft without grooves and with a properly designed 'O' Ring seal in the end so we can seal worn cam carriers.

    We did some very basic FEA modelling and the groove doesn't really impact on the 'swell' of the shaft.

    If they work it may be a reasonable fix for leaky shafts and easier than the RSR Seals.

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