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Thread: 72 T as a hot rod candidate...looking for opinions please

  1. #1

    72 T as a hot rod candidate...looking for opinions please

    I would appreciate hearing thoughts/opinions on what 'added value' (if any) the 72 model year with it's right side oil door would be vs. a 70, 71 or 73 T. I am undecided whether to use and modify the existing 2.4 (which is runnings carb with the MFI system is long gone), and with the ultimate goal to build a RS/RSR type (or something in between) hotrod the existing engine is not a big selling point to me. Also, the car was originally an AC car...seems to have been a dealer installed hack job, and all of the pieces (except for the various sheetmetal holes it left behind) are also gone. The 'holes' would of course be attended to during the rebuild/refurb I'd do. Car is a non-sunroof car which is a positive for build goal. Thanks to anyone willing to take the time to offer their thoughts.

  2. #2
    912->911 conversion
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    Mac - it's your car and ask yourself what is the value to you? Make it what you love, as an extension of yourself and run with it. If you didn't pay "investment prices" for it in the beginning, then don't fuss what it will be worth. Regardless of its worth in the end, you'll spend more than that building it up The 72 is definitely a cool base for a hot rod.
    Keith Adams
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    912 Registry | Early 911S Registry #906 | PCA member
    1969 Blutorange 912R - 912 to 911 conversion
    1969 Mercedes 280 SE Coupe - 6 cyl 5 speed

  3. #3
    Mac, your plan has been done many times before with good results. To keep it's full value as a stock '72T you would ideally replace the carbs with MFI and weld up the A/C holes during a rebuild back to factory spec. Making it into a hot rod has a plus side in that you probably won't lose value if done to the standards and specs that others would want. That's the catch, as that is a pretty high bar and a moving target. Still the '72 has its own appeal with the oil door and there are a lot of hot rods built over the years using the '72T as a base. It's a fun journey with a reasonable pay off, as long as you can straddle the line between personal and desirable.
    Randy Wells
    Automotive Writer/Photographer/Filmmaker
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    Early S Registry #187

  4. #4
    Thank you both for providing your thoughts. The end product will be top quality and done tastefully.

  5. #5
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    If it's an original paint survivor then you might consider keeping it stock but it doesn't seem that's the case. Hot Rod that puppy! Does a 72 Hot Rod have more value then a 70,71 or 73? To some yes it does. I know a few guys that seem to love these 72's for some reason.
    72S, 72T now ST

  6. #6
    Senior Member tcsracing1's Avatar
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    if it is an original numbers matching car, it will always be worth more stock. (however it will also cost more to restore it back to stock if you are missing alot of correct parts.)

    As a T, it makes a good basis for a hot rod because it is less money to start with then an E or S.
    Stock is boring. And fully restored T demand is not crazy high.

    1972T hot rod with oil flapper is cool. One year only flapper is cool no matter what size rear fenders are on the car.

    Personally, I do not think i would RS or RSR a 1972 because the oil flapper is very distinct. If anything, i would make it a ST before i did RS or RSR.

    if you kept the original fenders, motor and paint color, then you could have a numbers matching car that maintains originality but is tasefully upgraded/hot rodded to your tastes.
    Not a bad way to maintain the overall value.
    And Stock fendered 69-73 cars are cool.

    Take your stock 2.4L, twin plug the heads and or overbore the cylinders with larger pistons. Custom grind the cams.
    Webber carbs or PMOs. Clean and simple. Fun.

    What was the original color of the car?

    I would give the car some really cool seats and interior. Nice exhaust. 6" fuchs all the way around on AVONS.
    Good suspension and exposed oil lines.
    LOOKING FOR 1967S TRANSMISSION #103586
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tcsracing1 View Post
    if it is an original numbers matching car, it will always be worth more stock. (however it will also cost more to restore it back to stock if you are missing alot of correct parts.)

    As a T, it makes a good basis for a hot rod because it is less money to start with then an E or S.
    Stock is boring. And fully restored T demand is not crazy high.

    1972T hot rod with oil flapper is cool. One year only flapper is cool no matter what size rear fenders are on the car.

    Personally, I do not think i would RS or RSR a 1972 because the oil flapper is very distinct. If anything, i would make it a ST before i did RS or RSR.

    if you kept the original fenders, motor and paint color, then you could have a numbers matching car that maintains originality but is tasefully upgraded/hot rodded to your tastes.
    Not a bad way to maintain the overall value.
    And Stock fendered 69-73 cars are cool.

    Take your stock 2.4L, twin plug the heads and or overbore the cylinders with larger pistons. Custom grind the cams.
    Webber carbs or PMOs. Clean and simple. Fun.

    What was the original color of the car?

    I would give the car some really cool seats and interior. Nice exhaust. 6" fuchs all the way around on AVONS.
    Good suspension and exposed oil lines.
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts...you've given me lots to think about. Originally a 936 Silver car with a single 'white' repaint that needs to be done again. I already did an original silver 73-S and my 70-S is and was an original light ivory car. Color change is easy on the 72 because I completely disassembly/strip the cars, and here too I want some license and freedom to do the 72 car my way. Some very nicely done hot rods seem to exceed the value of a stock T from what I a seeing, and then again, I have a nut and bolt restored 70-S and just not the direction I want to take with the 72 car. If we agree that the T is both boring and likely never to have a high resale compared to an E or S, these too are reasons I was hoping to play with the flairs a bit rather than keep them stock and continue to run 'skinny' FUCHS. Getting the car today and with the extend of disassembly I do, plenty of time to make decisions. I will look more into examples - original and redone - of an ST . I appreciate your reply.

  8. #8
    Senior Member tcsracing1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mac73s View Post
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts...you've given me lots to think about. Originally a 936 Silver car with a single 'white' repaint that needs to be done again. I already did an original silver 73-S and my 70-S is and was an original light ivory car. Color change is easy on the 72 because I completely disassembly/strip the cars, and here too I want some license and freedom to do the 72 car my way. Some very nicely done hot rods seem to exceed the value of a stock T from what I a seeing, and then again, I have a nut and bolt restored 70-S and just not the direction I want to take with the 72 car. If we agree that the T is both boring and likely never to have a high resale compared to an E or S, these too are reasons I was hoping to play with the flairs a bit rather than keep them stock and continue to run 'skinny' FUCHS. Getting the car today and with the extend of disassembly I do, plenty of time to make decisions. I will look more into examples - original and redone - of an ST . I appreciate your reply.
    If you already have a silver car and norrow body porsches, then a color change with wide body will be the ticket for you!

    A 72ST in a cool color would work.
    LOOKING FOR 1967S TRANSMISSION #103586
    Looking For 1969T Engine #6195922
    Looking For 1969T Transmission #7194313

    Looking for 1969T Transmission #7195495
    www.tcspeed.com

  9. #9
    912->911 conversion
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcsracing1 View Post
    If you already have a silver car and norrow body porsches, then a color change with wide body will be the ticket for you!

    A 72ST in a cool color would work.
    I like where your head is at Tom!

    Keith Adams
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    912 Registry | Early 911S Registry #906 | PCA member
    1969 Blutorange 912R - 912 to 911 conversion
    1969 Mercedes 280 SE Coupe - 6 cyl 5 speed

  10. #10
    Thank you guys for your continued ideas and support. She is safely in my garage now. If I do pull the trigger on fender flairs, I would appreciate hearing who makes the best quality? Thanks!

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