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Thread: Air Cooled radials. . 1943

  1. #1
    Senior Member 62S-R-S's Avatar
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    Air Cooled radials. . 1943

    A study in contrasts. BMW 14 Cyl, Pratt & Whitney 18 Cyl.


    Fw-190 Egon Meyer / P-47 Robert Johnson

    https://ytcropper.com/cropped/fA5da25cdebdc52

  2. #2
    Senior Member 62S-R-S's Avatar
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    Name:  56th fighter group P-47D Thunderbolt.jpg
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  3. #3
    Early S Reg #1395 LongRanger's Avatar
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    Air-cooler Radials . . . 1944

    Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major

    4-row, 28 cyl = 4360 cid (hence, etc) . . . .

    . . . + twin turbos + supercharger = 4500 hp


    Jets saved the Mechs from dealing with these




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    Early S Reg #1395 LongRanger's Avatar
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    Erich Hartmann . . .

    . . . aka 'Bubi' (little boy) aka Schwartzer Teufel (Black Devil)

    Started out in gliders, joined the Luftwaffe as a combat pilot in 1942, age 20, JG 52, Eastern front

    >1400 sorties, >800 aerial combats, crashed 16 times (but never shot down in combat), captured twice (?) = 352 kills

    Awarded Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross
    Added Oak Leaves
    Added Swords and Diamonds

    Turned over to the Soviets after surrendering to the Americans in 1945
    Refused to join the East German National People's Army = charged with war crimes + 10 years in prison
    Released ~1955
    Joined the modern Bundesluftwaffe in 1956
    Retired in 1970 after criticizing the adoption of the F-104
    Died on 20 September, 1993


    '. . . his proudest achievement wasn’t his 352 kills. It was that he never lost a wingman . . .'


    Oh-yeah . . . born in Weissach



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  5. #5

    Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp

    The engine that powered the P-47 Thunderbolt, the F6F Hellcat and the F4U Corsair.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pratt_...00_Double_Wasp



    Jon B.
    Vista, CA

  6. #6
    My Dad was a test cell chief for Pratt & Whitney during WW2. Not allowed to join service because "a needed war worker". Wanted to join the Merchant Marine. Blown up in test of Twin Wasp (his designation as I remember it). They couldn't get them to turn over in the cold of the Aleutians. He was in charge of experimenting with various priming agents. One of his guys was killed by the heavy wooden test cell doors and the other guy lost sense of taste and smell when blown backwards into the electrical panel. Dad, unlike me, only weighed 135 pounds and flew through the open door and down the hall. I have always held a grudge against Wasp engines but my Dad had a great deal of respect for them both in design and performance. Still got the service manual out in the garage.

  7. #7
    Senior Member 62S-R-S's Avatar
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    The priming cycle and startup in Idaho...note fellow to the right :
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=BkeOshaVpFI


    http://andersonaeromotive.net/rays-r...on-the-planet/

  8. #8
    Pratt and Whitney kind of like Porsche. Wasp started out as a 7 cylinder single bank engine. Wanted more power so they hooked two together. I think the double was was the same for another of their engines (R1690) that they doubled up to be the dual Wasp. 356 evolution to 911. More cylinders = more power. Don't think they had any of the problems with the rear end breaking loose to cause a spin ('67S).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by doigthom View Post
    My Dad was a test cell chief for Pratt & Whitney during WW2... Blown up in test of Twin Wasp (his designation as I remember it)...
    My father serviced R-1830 Twin Wasp engines on PBY Catalinas during the war. It was a smaller engine than the later R-2800 Double Wasp.
    I have a photo of him, somewhere, at an Embry-Riddle engine test facility early in the war.

    Jon B.
    Vista, CA

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon B View Post
    My father serviced R-1830 Twin Wasp engines on PBY Catalinas during the war...
    One of his naval uniforms from WWII, as an Aviation Machinist's Mate.

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    Jon B.
    Vista, CA

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