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Thread: Converting to a gated shifter

  1. #11
    Senior Member NorthernThrux's Avatar
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    LOL. It’s a lost art and good exercise Jim.

    Yes, we all love these old cars and love mastering their quirks. But some quirks detract from the fun. I went out on a coffee bean run today and came back almost 2 hours and 100 miles later even though the coffee shop was 14 minutes away. It was a nice crisp morning, but the shifter was a big crisp improvement too.
    Early 911S Registry # 2395
    1973 Porsche 911S in ivory white 5sp MT
    2015 Porsche Macan S in agate grey 7sp PDK

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSTarga View Post
    That sounds like your plastic bushings are broken or worn out.
    Very interesting, where are these located? I searched around a bit on the issue and concluded that it was an internal gearbox thing. Itís a 72 indeed.
    1972 911 2.4 T Targa Aubergine (MFI)
    2000 996 Carrera Ocean Blue
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  3. #13
    member #1515
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    At the base of the shifter and in the tunnel between the shifter and the coupling. The shift rod runs through these plastic bushings.
    David

    '73 S Targa #0830 2.7 MFI rebuilt to RS specs

  4. #14
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    Thanks, will check!
    1972 911 2.4 T Targa Aubergine (MFI)
    2000 996 Carrera Ocean Blue
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  5. #15
    Senior Member NorthernThrux's Avatar
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    Fredrik, It's the last picture in my first post. Be aware that the stock bushings have an oval internal hole and there is meant to be a little bit of play in them. About 1 mm. Anything more and they are worn and need to be replaced. Here is a good article for the rear of the tunnel components. https://blog.fcpeuro.com/how-to-repl...ed-porsche-911

    If you need to push the bushing out of the coupler, just use a socket with the right diameter in a vice. Works nicely. Also use it to press in the new ones. There are a variety of new options from metal to stock, with and without the oval internal hole.

    The front is easy. See this article. https://www.pelicanparts.com/techart...provements.htm

    All the parts are cheap and it's an easy afternoon to get it all done.
    Early 911S Registry # 2395
    1973 Porsche 911S in ivory white 5sp MT
    2015 Porsche Macan S in agate grey 7sp PDK

  6. #16
    Senior Member 62S-R-S's Avatar
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    The 915 was the single worst hassle on the mid year car I had.. for about 1 -2 yrs it balked frequently into second gear, plus being unpleasant in downshift experiences.. having consistency with it. Somehow later, it grows on you with enough time into it. There were also racers who complained, where one was not among them, Mark Donohue.

    As soon as I heard that, it suggested that maybe there's an extra dimension involved to get proficient, but once you do you're converted forever.

  7. #17
    Senior Member NorthernThrux's Avatar
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    Certainly agree. As with any manual transmission, there is a learning curve of clutch and shifter. And there are differences from car to car. Mastering a manual gearbox is very Zen and it's why we love these cars...and probably mechanical things in general. Double clutching certainly helps on a 915, though I've now found with these mods that I can skip that, but I do still pause every so slightly between gears for the synchros to catch up. You feel really good when you perfect that. It's no different than the trailing throttle oversteer these cars have too. Mastering that is so satisfying, and I have a long way to go in that regard.

    The best shifter I ever had was in my 2012 Boxster Spyder. Telepathic and amazing on the track or at an autocross. Also amazingly satisfying, but for different reasons.
    Early 911S Registry # 2395
    1973 Porsche 911S in ivory white 5sp MT
    2015 Porsche Macan S in agate grey 7sp PDK

  8. #18
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    Thanks Ravi. I do have a short shift kit in my car so it might be slightly different than original (don't know which type).

    That being said, last weekend in the Alps with the Euro2020 tour I really started to appreciate the shifter and gearbox much more. If you get in to the "flow" on a mountain pass it just starts to work and you realize that this is what is was designed to do.
    1972 911 2.4 T Targa Aubergine (MFI)
    2000 996 Carrera Ocean Blue
    Member #3833

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