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Thread: Factory installation of LWB rear license plate bracket

  1. #1
    Senior Member rgupta250's Avatar
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    Factory installation of LWB rear license plate bracket

    Hi Everyone:

    As I continue down the journey of restoring my 71T, one topic has surfaced which I need your help. It is related to the mounting procedure for the rear license plate bracket on a LWB.
    Specifically, I am trying to determine what was the factory correct way the single bar license plate bracket (see pics below) were installed onto the rear license plate panel.

    When we disassembled the car, the bracket in question was mounted via bolts and nuts (see pic below). The bolt head has M 88 markings on them. The bolts were mounted through two 7mm holes in the panel. Is this the correct way to mount the bracket or should hex sheet metal screws been used?

    Best,
    Ravi
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    1971 911T/2.45 engine spec Coupe / Gold Metallic on Black
    1995 911 C2 / Guards Red on Cashmere Beige (Sold)

  2. #2
    I think all of mine are bolts/nuts like yours.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    The bolts are correct. I blast and paint the brackets black and use yellow zinc hardware.
    72S, 72T now ST

  4. #4
    Senior Member raspritz's Avatar
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    While restoring my '69, I was told by my mechanic (who worked at Porsche dealerships in the '70s) that cars arrived at the local dealerships with the rear panel undrilled, and that license plate brackets were drilled and mounted by the dealer. That makes sense, as the size, shape, and position of license plates differ from country to country. And at least into the '70s, many states did not require a front license plate at all. The point being, there really is no "period correct" standard for license plate bracket hardware.
    Rich Spritz

    1959 BMC Huffaker Mk1 Formula Junior racecar
    1967 Porsche 911 racecar
    1969 Porsche 911T
    1973 Merlyn Mk24 Formula Ford racecar
    2007 Porsche 997C4 cab (totaled by an idiot running a stop sign)
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    2019 Cayman GTS (wife's)

  5. #5
    Senior Member rgupta250's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies, everyone. I was already heavily leaning to re-install the bracket with the bolts and nuts.

    My early Porsche metal/body and paint restorer claims that using bolt and nuts does not make sense because if you needed to remove the bracket you would need to drop the muffler. He states he has seen quite a few LWB cars with the brackets mounted via a hex sheet metal screws which allows for simple removal. It begs the question >> why would you need to remove the rear license plate bracket anyways??

    /Ravi
    ------------------------------------------------
    1971 911T/2.45 engine spec Coupe / Gold Metallic on Black
    1995 911 C2 / Guards Red on Cashmere Beige (Sold)

  6. #6
    Senior Member ejboyd5's Avatar
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    If you were tasked with doing the job would you use bolts and nuts or sheet metal screws. I'm guessing the answer lies with your personal work ethic or perhaps the demands placed on you by an employer. I know how I would do it, right down to stainless hardware and lock washers.

  7. #7
    NUT _ZERTS,,,,then you only have bolts
    Early S Registry member #90
    R Gruppe member #138
    Fort Worth Tx.

  8. #8
    I agree with Ed, nut zerts, nutserts or rivnuts all the same idea, much cleaner

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    The original unmolested cars I've worked on looked like this but since dealer installed there's no right answer. My experience is mainly with 70-73. This is what I like.
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    72S, 72T now ST

  10. #10
    Senior Member rgupta250's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longballa View Post
    The original unmolested cars I've worked on looked like this but since dealer installed there's no right answer. My experience is mainly with 70-73. This is what I like.
    Thanks Scott, I am going to move forward with your setup.

    Best,
    Ravi
    ------------------------------------------------
    1971 911T/2.45 engine spec Coupe / Gold Metallic on Black
    1995 911 C2 / Guards Red on Cashmere Beige (Sold)

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